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Lordship Lane Primary School

Learning Together - Achieving Together

Pupil Premium

Pupil premium three-year strategy statement for Lordship Lane Primary School 2021-2022

Introduction

The Pupil Premium is the funding allocated by government to children who are entitled to Free School Meals or who have claimed Free School Meals in the past 6 years. It is also allocated to Looked After Pupils and children of Service Personnel. The funding was given to schools in an attempt to close the gap in attainment between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children. Closing this gap has been challenging for schools and the reasons for the gap are numerous and complex. Nationally, a disadvantaged child is still more than twice as likely as their classmates from more advantaged homes to leave primary school without reaching expected levels in reading and writing.

The aim of this money is to try to close the attainment gap between pupils and to try and remove any barriers to learning that pupils may face. At Lordship Lane Primary School, the Pupil Premium has been making a significant difference to our disadvantaged pupils. Our pupil premium pupils are a defined group but we are careful not to label pupils and make assumptions about their learning. Instead, we look at pupils as individuals in our pupil progress reviews, considering any barriers they be facing and deciding what support each child would most benefit from in order to make the best possible progress.

 

The pupil premium budget has been reducing over past 4 years as take up of Free School Meals has been less. This is partly related to free dinner being offered to all EYFS and KS1 pupils. Parents who receive benefits are still encouraged to apply for free school meals. We are adopting a 3-year strategy plan to help us plan the most effective use of the pupil premium grant. This plan is a working document and will evolve throughout the year as we carefully monitor the progress and wellbeing of our disadvantaged and vulnerable students. We will update the plan annually on the school’s website.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Lordship Lane Primary School

Number of pupils in school

504

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

35%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/2022

Date this statement was published

1st December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

1st December 2022

Statement authorised by

Michelle Randles - Headteacher

Pupil premium lead

Jennifer Langstaffe
Deputy Head Teacher

Governor / Trustee lead

Iftikhar Hussain

Curriculum Committee Chair

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£ 244790

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£

  • Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

  • We are a large inner-London Primary school where approximately 75% of children do not speak English as their first language. In the upper school we are three form entry, but the recent shrinking of London has meant two form entry in year R, and smaller classes than we would like in other year groups.
  • In year 3, the effects of the pandemic are at their greatest, and therefore we have taken the step of dividing the three-form entry into four small classes to help these children catch up.
  • We have high expectations for all pupils and believe that deprivation and challenge does not mean low ability.  We are aware that not all pupils who are entitled to free school meals are socially disadvantaged, just as we acknowledge that some socially disadvantaged children do not qualify for FSM.
  • Common barriers to learning can be less support from home, weak language and communication skills, lack of confidence, more frequent behaviour difficulties and attendance and punctuality issues.  There may also be complex family situations that prevent children from flourishing.
  • Our aim is that all children will have access to:
    -    Quality First Teaching
  • A Tailored Curriculum which identifies gaps and teaches key concepts
    Personalised WIN (What I Need) sessions
  • The government’s tutoring programme where necessary (NTP)
  • Additional time for Phonics and/or Early Reading strategies.
    Behaviour support via our Learning Mentors
  • After-school activities to develop physical skills
  • Free breakfast club where appropriate
  • Homework Club
  • In year 6, a residential visit to rural south Wales

This list is not exhaustive and will change to meet the needs of our pupils

  • Pupil Premium funding will be used to support the initiatives above for whole classes, small groups or individuals based on an analysis of need.
  • By these methods, we will narrow the attainment gap so that all children are targeted to achieve ARE by the end of year 6.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Low attainment on entry into EYFS stage

2

Restricted language and communication skills

3

High percentage of EAL across all year groups (approximately 80%)

4

More frequent behavioural difficulties

5

Attendance and Punctuality

6

High level SEND across the school (22% across the school)

7

Low parental engagement

8

Many pupils with Social Services involvement

9

6 ECT teachers

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Phonics

Achieve national or above in PSC

Attendance

Ensure attendance of disadvantaged pupils is above 95%

RWM

To be in line with other national data

Cultural Capital

All pupils to have access to high quality trips and visits

Speech and Language

Increasing number of pupils to have access to SALT interventions, with this impacting on the development of these pupils.

 

 

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Division of year 3 into four smaller classes

Meaning an extra teacher has been employed

Data showed that year 3 had suffered the most from the Covid pandemic.  The children needed additional support to catch up with reading and phonics.

1
2
3
4
6

Extensive training programme in phonics and early reading

All TAs and teachers in EYFS and Key Stage 1 have received training on phonics – leading to a consistent approach across the school, and rapidly raising attainment.

Our first two data drops of the autumn term show that the children are making progress by being in the appropriate group.  Children with better skills are able to be supported to begin Early Reading schemes, thus helping to close attainment gaps.

1
2
3

Purchase of ‘Flash Academy’ and associated lap tops for EAL pupils

Approximately 75% of children have English as an additional language.

Pupil mobility that we accept many pupils in-year who have no or little English. These children are supported by learning modules from Flash Academy

3

Speech and Language therapist

“Unlocking Language” one day a week assess children for speech and language difficulties and advise on appropriate strategies.

2

6

TA provision for year 1

In addition to TAs allocated to 1:1 support, each year 1 class has the support of a TA, who is trained in phonics and maths strategies.

1

2

3

4

6

Talk for Writing

Specialist consultant support to encourage better outcomes in writing by promoting the initial dialogue between pupils and staff.  Targeted CPD sessions for each year group have supported the development of structured discussions

1

2

3

6

DHT to support teaching –  Rosenshine principles to underpin learning strategies.

Rosenshine principles embedded into classroom teaching. CPD sessions run weekly to support Rosenshine.

1

6

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Years R to 3 streamed for intensive support in phonics – requiring additional support from TAs

Evidence that progress is accelerating and fluency increasing as children receive targeted support.  Reception class children are now able to blend their sounds and more children are beginning the RWI scheme across the KS1 year

1

3

6

NTP programme

1:3 tutors working across year 2, 5 and 6 in phonics, reading and maths.

1

3

6

2 Specialist SEND teachers

0.5 teacher supporting SEND across EYFS and KS1.

0.5 teacher supporting SEND across KS1.

1

6

Additional support for behaviour from two learning mentors

Learning mentors supporting children with their behaviour and providing intervention sessions on behaviour, friendships and zones of regulation.

1

4

Music Therapy

Supports our most vulnerable pupils to express and build on their language skills – supporting their emotional regulation.

1

4

6

Times tables ‘Rock Stars’

Supports children with their mathematical times tables knowledge.

1

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Child Protection Officer (PT)

PP children are disproportionately represented in our CP case load.  As our mental health lead our CPO supports families across the school and pupils with their mental health and wellbeing.

With in the additional increase in Social Service involvement, it is essential that we know our children and can spot triggers which will affect learning.

4

7

8

Learning Support Officer
(Behaviour Support)

Children receive personalised support from the learning mentors to regulate their own behaviour in school.

4

8

 

Total budgeted cost: £ [insert sum of 3 amounts stated above]

Pupil premium three-year strategy statement for Lordship Lane Primary School 2021-2022

Introduction

The Pupil Premium is the funding allocated by government to children who are entitled to Free School Meals or who have claimed Free School Meals in the past 6 years. It is also allocated to Looked After Pupils and children of Service Personnel. The funding was given to schools in an attempt to close the gap in attainment between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children. Closing this gap has been challenging for schools and the reasons for the gap are numerous and complex. Nationally, a disadvantaged child is still more than twice as likely as their classmates from more advantaged homes to leave primary school without reaching expected levels in reading and writing.

The aim of this money is to try to close the attainment gap between pupils and to try and remove any barriers to learning that pupils may face. At Lordship Lane Primary School, the Pupil Premium has been making a significant difference to our disadvantaged pupils. Our pupil premium pupils are a defined group but we are careful not to label pupils and make assumptions about their learning. Instead, we look at pupils as individuals in our pupil progress reviews, considering any barriers they be facing and deciding what support each child would most benefit from in order to make the best possible progress.

 

The pupil premium budget has been reducing over past 4 years as take up of Free School Meals has been less. This is partly related to free dinner being offered to all EYFS and KS1 pupils. Parents who receive benefits are still encouraged to apply for free school meals. We are adopting a 3-year strategy plan to help us plan the most effective use of the pupil premium grant. This plan is a working document and will evolve throughout the year as we carefully monitor the progress and wellbeing of our disadvantaged and vulnerable students. We will update the plan annually on the school’s website.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Lordship Lane Primary School

Number of pupils in school

504

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

35%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/2022

Date this statement was published

1st December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

1st December 2022

Statement authorised by

Michelle Randles - Headteacher

Pupil premium lead

Jennifer Langstaffe
Deputy Head Teacher

Governor / Trustee lead

Iftikhar Hussain

Curriculum Committee Chair

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£ 244790

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£

  • Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

  • We are a large inner-London Primary school where approximately 75% of children do not speak English as their first language. In the upper school we are three form entry, but the recent shrinking of London has meant two form entry in year R, and smaller classes than we would like in other year groups.
  • In year 3, the effects of the pandemic are at their greatest, and therefore we have taken the step of dividing the three-form entry into four small classes to help these children catch up.
  • We have high expectations for all pupils and believe that deprivation and challenge does not mean low ability.  We are aware that not all pupils who are entitled to free school meals are socially disadvantaged, just as we acknowledge that some socially disadvantaged children do not qualify for FSM.
  • Common barriers to learning can be less support from home, weak language and communication skills, lack of confidence, more frequent behaviour difficulties and attendance and punctuality issues.  There may also be complex family situations that prevent children from flourishing.
  • Our aim is that all children will have access to:
    -    Quality First Teaching
  • A Tailored Curriculum which identifies gaps and teaches key concepts
    Personalised WIN (What I Need) sessions
  • The government’s tutoring programme where necessary (NTP)
  • Additional time for Phonics and/or Early Reading strategies.
    Behaviour support via our Learning Mentors
  • After-school activities to develop physical skills
  • Free breakfast club where appropriate
  • Homework Club
  • In year 6, a residential visit to rural south Wales

This list is not exhaustive and will change to meet the needs of our pupils

  • Pupil Premium funding will be used to support the initiatives above for whole classes, small groups or individuals based on an analysis of need.
  • By these methods, we will narrow the attainment gap so that all children are targeted to achieve ARE by the end of year 6.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Low attainment on entry into EYFS stage

2

Restricted language and communication skills

3

High percentage of EAL across all year groups (approximately 80%)

4

More frequent behavioural difficulties

5

Attendance and Punctuality

6

High level SEND across the school (22% across the school)

7

Low parental engagement

8

Many pupils with Social Services involvement

9

6 ECT teachers

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Phonics

Achieve national or above in PSC

Attendance

Ensure attendance of disadvantaged pupils is above 95%

RWM

To be in line with other national data

Cultural Capital

All pupils to have access to high quality trips and visits

Speech and Language

Increasing number of pupils to have access to SALT interventions, with this impacting on the development of these pupils.

 

 

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Division of year 3 into four smaller classes

Meaning an extra teacher has been employed

Data showed that year 3 had suffered the most from the Covid pandemic.  The children needed additional support to catch up with reading and phonics.

1
2
3
4
6

Extensive training programme in phonics and early reading

All TAs and teachers in EYFS and Key Stage 1 have received training on phonics – leading to a consistent approach across the school, and rapidly raising attainment.

Our first two data drops of the autumn term show that the children are making progress by being in the appropriate group.  Children with better skills are able to be supported to begin Early Reading schemes, thus helping to close attainment gaps.

1
2
3

Purchase of ‘Flash Academy’ and associated lap tops for EAL pupils

Approximately 75% of children have English as an additional language.

Pupil mobility that we accept many pupils in-year who have no or little English. These children are supported by learning modules from Flash Academy

3

Speech and Language therapist

“Unlocking Language” one day a week assess children for speech and language difficulties and advise on appropriate strategies.

2

6

TA provision for year 1

In addition to TAs allocated to 1:1 support, each year 1 class has the support of a TA, who is trained in phonics and maths strategies.

1

2

3

4

6

Talk for Writing

Specialist consultant support to encourage better outcomes in writing by promoting the initial dialogue between pupils and staff.  Targeted CPD sessions for each year group have supported the development of structured discussions

1

2

3

6

Seconded DHT to support teaching – introduction of Rosenshine principles to underpin learning strategies.

Rosenshine principles embedded into classroom teaching. CPD sessions run weekly to support Rosenshine.

1

6

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Years R to 3 streamed for intensive support in phonics – requiring additional support from TAs

Evidence that progress is accelerating and fluency increasing as children receive targeted support.  Reception class children are now able to blend their sounds and more children are beginning the RWI scheme across the KS1 year

1

3

6

NTP programme

1:3 tutors working across year 2, 5 and 6 in phonics, reading and maths.

1

3

6

2 Specialist SEND teachers

0.5 teacher supporting SEND across EYFS and KS1.

0.5 teacher supporting SEND across KS1.

1

6

Additional support for behaviour from two learning mentors

Learning mentors supporting children with their behaviour and providing intervention sessions on behaviour, friendships and zones of regulation.

1

4

Music Therapy

Supports our most vulnerable pupils to express and build on their language skills – supporting their emotional regulation.

1

4

6

Times tables ‘Rock Stars’

Supports children with their mathematical times tables knowledge.

1

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £ [insert amount]

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Child Protection Officer (PT)

PP children are disproportionately represented in our CP case load.  As our mental health lead our CPO supports families across the school and pupils with their mental health and wellbeing.

With in the additional increase in Social Service involvement, it is essential that we know our children and can spot triggers which will affect learning.

4

7

8

Learning Support Officer
(Behaviour Support)

Children receive personalised support from the learning mentors to regulate their own behaviour in school.

4

8

 

Total budgeted cost: £ [insert sum of 3 amounts stated above]

 

Pupil Premium Report 2018/19 and Plan for 2019/20

Pupil Premium Report 2020/2021

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